Now that you have considered moving on to graduate school, it’s time to start thinking about taking the General Graduate Record Examination (GRE). Just like the many other challenges you have faced, it is important to develop strategies as you approach your GRE test date.

It is crucial that you keep an eye on deadlines. This includes the deadline for your graduate program (you want to make sure your official GRE scores make it in on time). Once you figure out the date you need to have the scores submitted to the university, then it is important that you give yourself enough time to actually take the exam. Keep in mind, you may choose to retake the GRE if you feel your scores do not truly reflect your abilities.

All of the official GRE information can be found at www.ets.org. There you can find all of the relevant information on the test format. You can also learn more about registration, test centers, and test dates. The website also fully explains scoring and testing policies.

The ETS GRE website also offers excellent resources to begin preparing for the test day. They offer sample questions and full-length practice tests, as well as math refreshers and other guides. For some people, enrolling in a test prep course is beneficial. If a GRE prep course is too expensive for your budget, don’t get discouraged.  You can study independently witha GRE prep books.  If the cost of the prep materials is too great, most are available at your local library, or in the Career Center (on the bottom floor of the Campus Center building). As with all challenges, the results should improve greatly with the amount of time and effort you put into it.  Be prepared to study for the GRE as intensively as you would study for any course!   If a course takes 14 weeks to get through, give yourself at least 14 weeks to study for the GRE.

List of websites for GRE prep courses and prep resources:

Also check out Amazon for GRE preparation materials.

Basics of the General Graduate Record Exam (GRE)

What’s the GRE’s purpose?

  • Required for entrance to Graduate schools.
  • Used to grant fellowships and financial aid
  • Used as an assessment tool of skills necessary for graduate programs

What is the science behind the GRE?

  • Designed by the Educational Testing Service (ETS)
  • Based on Psychometrics – “the science of standardized tests”
    • Reliability of scores is expected to determine what students will do well in a graduate program
    • The GRE tests the same concepts every time
    • Scores are rated on the bell curve (some will do well, others will do poorly, but most end up in the middle)

What should you expect taking the GRE?

  • Tests are administered on a computer at a testing center. Those who wish to take the rest must register in advance on the ETS website:  www.ets.org.
  • The exam takes approximately 3 hours and 45 minutes to complete.
  • The test consists of the following sections that can be administered in any order:
    • One Analytical Writing section
      • Section 1: Analyze an issue
      • Section 2: Analyze an argument
      • 30 minutes each section
    • Two Verbal Reasoning sections
      • Contain 20 questions each
      • 30 minutes each section
    • Two Quantitative Reasoning sections
      • Contain 20 questions each
      • 35 minutes provided for each section
      • On-screen calculator available
    • One Experimental section
      • The GRE has incorporated an additional Quantitative or Verbal section into the exam that doesn’t count toward your score.  It looks exactly like a real section…so you have no idea whether or not it’s the one you will be scored for! Never assume that the section you are on is the experimental section.

Are there any helpful tips to keep in mind when preparing to take the GRE?

  • It is recommended that you begin studying at least 3 months in advance of your scheduled exam date.  Schedule ample GRE studying time into your daily agenda (2 – 3 hours a day is suggested).  Begin by taking a full length practice test to get a sense of your baseline performance, and complete as many additional practice tests as you can in this time while keeping track of changes in your scores. It may be helpful to set goals for raising your scores, but keep in mind that most test takers will not be able to drastically change their verbal or quantitative reasoning abilities in a few short weeks. A few points can go a long way.
  • You may wish to enroll in a GRE prep course or find yourself a reputable GRE tutor.  Kaplan, Barron’s and Princeton review offer courses and additional practice tests for purchase.  These are often expensive, but recommended for those who study best with clear feedback or who wish to have outside accountability for their study time. 
  • When scheduling your GRE General Test, the current fees online are $185 (subject to change annually).  The cancellation policy is strict (only half of the fee will be refunded to you after submitting payment), and changing the date or location of the exam costs $50 each time you reschedule.  Scheduling changes, including cancellations must occur three full days (which means before the end of the 4th day) prior to the exam.  Please make sure that the date you choose is the date you will stick to in order to avoid wasting money.  If an emergency arises or you get sick the day of the exam, your exam fees will be forfeited if you do not show up for your appointment.  You will have to pay the full $185 fee again in order to schedule a new appointment!
  • Before you select a time and date, consider what your usual schedule is like, and which times of day you feel you think most clearly. Plan to dedicate the day of your GRE appointment only to taking the test, and avoid any late nights before or stress-inducing activities soon after. You do not want poor sleep or mental distraction to affect your performance.
  • Be sure to schedule your GRE with enough time to retake it if you do not do as well as you would like the first time around.  Here is a link to the ETS website where you can schedule the exam:  http://www.ets.org/gre/revised_general/register?WT.ac=grehome_reg_c_121008
  • The GRE scoring system has changed as of August 2011.  To view a GRE concordance table comparing prior GRE scores with the current system, click here:   http://www.ets.org/s/gre/pdf/concordance_information.pdf

What should you review?

Verbal Reasoning

The Verbal Reasoning section of the GRE is designed to test your vocabulary and how well you recognize words in context.  Some of the “GRE words” may have familiar meanings to you, some may not.  It is important, however, to realize that even the words that you are familiar with may have different connotations given the context. 

It is highly recommended that you get used to how these words are used in text by reading scholarly articles and newspapers geared toward an educated audience (NY times, Huffington post, The Economist).  Pay careful attention to the main topic of the article, the purpose of the message (i.e. to inform or to persuade), and know how to “read between the lines.”  For example, if the author of an article is writing to argue a point, locate the author’s premise, statements used to back that premise, the main argument, and other key elements to the article.  The GRE tests your ability to comprehend complex passages, and sharpening your ability to understand the words used as well as their meaning in context is imperative to getting the score that you want.

Here are some very basic study tips to guide you in your Verbal Reasoning GRE preparation:

Vocabulary Concepts

  • Vocabulary Building
    • Use GRE word flashcards. When completing reading assignments,look up words for which you do not know the meanings for, and read words in context.  Don’t just study definitions! You may want to keep an ongoing vocabulary journal (handwriting notes can aid in memory).
  • Group words with common meanings together.
  • Recognize Greek & Latin roots
  • Words in Context
    • Read scholarly articles and other complex reading materials (i.e. NY times, The Economist) regularly.
  • Know how to identify the different parts of speech
    • Words with alternative meanings
    • Nouns
    • Adjectives
    • Verbs

Reading Comprehension Strategies

  • Break down the text
    • Read the 1st Third of the Passage
      • Main idea of the passage
      • Overall structure & tone
    • Determine Topic, Scope & Author’s purpose
      • Topic vs. scope
      • Author’s purpose
    • Read Strategically
      • What are you reading?
      • Paraphrase complex ideas
      • Ask questions as you are reading
      • Take notes

Text Completion

  • Fill-in-the-blanks section; includes either 1, 2 or 3 blanks per question
  • Method
    • Step 1: Read the sentence; look for clues
    • Step 2: Predict an answer.
    • Step 3: Select the choice that most closely matches your prediction.
    • Step 4: Check your answer.
  • ABSOLUTELY MUST STUDY VOCABULARY & SYNONYMS FOR THIS SECTION!!!
    • Many of the word choices have similar meanings…
    • For example, calamitous vs harmful (the correct answer may differ based on the degree of harm…calamitous is much worse a state than harmful is)
  • TIPS*
    • Look for what’s directly implied & not ambiguity
    • Don’t be too creative with your choices
    • Paraphrase long or complex sentences
    • Use root words
    • If you are really unsure, eliminate the obviously wrong answers and select from the remaining possibilities.

Sentence Equivalence

  • Identify 2 correct words to fit the meaning of a sentence to produce complete sentences similar in meaning
    • Step 1: Read sentence & look for clues
    • Step 2: Predict an answer
    • Step 3: Select 2 choices that seem to fit
    • Step 4: Check to see if sentence retains the same meaning
  • TIPS*
    • Consider all answers
    • Paraphrase the questions
    • Look beyond synonyms
    • Use prefixes, suffixes & roots

Reading Comprehension

  • Includes about 10 reading passages spread between 2 Verbal Reasoning sections of test
  • Each passage has 1-6 possible answers
    • Step 1:  Read the passage strategically
    • Step 2:  Analyze the question stem
    • Step 3:  Research relevant text in the question
    • Step 4:  Make a prediction
    • Step 5:  Evaluate the answers
  • TIPS*
    • Express the main idea in your own words
    • Focus on retaining ideas, not facts
    • Concentrate on using only what the passage gives youDo not approach the Bolded sentences differently
    • Do not get misled by variations on standard question stems

Quantitative Review

The GRE Quantitative sections include arithmetic, data analysis, algebra I, geometry & quantitative comparison. 

**Be aware that for most questions, the GRE will provide a group of answers to choose from.  Many of the choices to select from are chosen based on common wrong answers to the problem given.  This makes process of elimination extremely difficult if you do not know with certainty how to solve the problem.

We have provided in this section a very basic review of some of the concepts that you will need to know below.  However, GRE test preparation books and practice tests are the best way to review and get accustomed to answering quantitative reasoning questions (especially for reviewing Geometry, Algebra I and familiarizing yourself with Quantitative comparison). 

For step by step guidance through quantitative concepts, check Khanacademy.com or even YouTube, where educators often upload videos with examples for approaching various mathematical problems. This type of study may prove a valuable addition to textbook studying, without the costs associated with a test prep course.

Arithmetic and Data Analysis Basics

Addition & Multiplication

  • Commutative property – order doesn’t matter, a + b = b + a.
  • Associative property – grouping doesn’t matter, (a x b) x c = a x (b x c).
  • Identity element –  Addition is 0; Multiplication is 1
  • Additive inverse (addition) – opposite of # is 0; (1 + -1=0)
  • Multiplicative inverse (multiplication) – reciprocal of # is 1; (2 x ½ = 1); 0 has no inverse
  • Distributive property – # outside parentheses distributed to each # inside parentheses; 2(3+4)= 2(3) + 2(4)

Order of Operations

Please Excuse My Dear Aunt Sally

  1. Parentheses (then [brackets], then {braces})
  2. Exponents & Square roots
  3. Multiplication & Division
  4. Addition & Subtraction

Helpful Divisibility Rules

A Number is Divisible by:

If:

2

It ends in 0, 2, 4, 6, or 8

3

The sum of the digits is divisible by 3

4

The number formed by the last 2 digits is divisible by 4

5

It ends in 0 or 5

6

It is divisible by 2 and 3

7

No simple rule here

8

The number formed by the last 3 digits is divisible by 8

9

The sum of its digits is divisible by 9

 

Fractions

  • Adding & Subtracting
    • Change the denominator to lowest common denominator, then add & subtract.  Borrow from whole #, if necessary.
  • Multiplying
    • Multiply numerators, then multiply denominators across.  Simplify.
  • Dividing
    • Invert & multiply.  Simplify.
    • Do Not get confused by complex fractions, such as ¾ / 7/8.  Invert to ¾ x 8/7 and solve.  Simplify.
    • Mixed numbers – change to improper fractions, invert, cancel out numerators & denominators to simplify and multiply across.

Decimals

Changing Decimals to Fractions

  • A decimal will be in a tenths, hundredths, thousandths place, etc.  Simply place the number over the appropriate denominator, i.e. ten, hundred, thousand, etc.; thus, .23 is equal to 23/100
  • Simplify when possible.  .25 changed to a fraction is 25/100 & simplified to ¼.

Multiplying Decimals

  • Count the total number of digits to the right of each decimal and add.  Your answer will have this many decimal places. 8.313 x .2 = 1.6626 (4 total places after decimal)

Dividing Decimals

  • Move the decimal point (in the divisor) as many places to the right to make it a whole number.  Then incorporate the same number of places to the right in the dividend.  Add 0s as necessary. 1.25 / 5 = 125 / 500

Changing Fractions to Decimals

  • Just divide the numerator by the denominator.

Changing Fractions to Percents

  1. Change to a decimal; ½ = .5
  2. Eliminate decimal and follow with % sign.  .5 = 50%

Percentages

Is/of Method : a.k.a Percents/proportions

(x)Percent #    “is” #

      100         = “of” #

Cross multiplying always produces same #s. 

Changing Percents to Fractions

  1. Drop % sign.
  2. Write over 100.
  3. Reduce if necessary.

IMPORTANT EQUIVALENTS TO MEMORIZE

Fraction =

Decimal =

Percentage

 

Fraction =

Decimal =

Percentage

1/100

.01

1%

 

1/8

0.125

12.5%(12 ½ %)

1/10

0.1

10%

 

3/8

0.375

37.5%

1/5 (or 2/10)

0.2

20%

 

5/8

0.625

62.5%

3/10

0.3

30%

 

7/8

0.875

87.5%

2/5 (or 4/10)

0.4

40%

 

1/6

0.16 2/3

16 2/3 %

1/2 (or 5/10)

0.5

50%

 

5/6

0.83 1/3

83 1/3 %

3/5 (or 6/10)

0.6

60%

 

 

 

 

7/10

0.7

70%

 

Whole#s=

Decimal =

Percentage

4/5 (or 8/10)

0.8

80%

 

1

1.00

100%

9/10

0.9

90%

 

2

2.00

200%

1/4(or25/100)

0.25

25%

 

2.5

2.50

250%

3/4(or75/100)

0.75

75%

 

50

50.00

5000%

1/3

0.33 1/3

33 1/3 %

 

100

100.00

10000%

 

Percent Changes(=/-)

Percent change =

Change

Starting point

Find % decrease of a $500 item on sale for $400.

100    1                   20%

500 = 5 = .20 =  decrease

Find % increase of a salary change from $1500 to $2000/month.

2000-1500=500, so

500/1500 = 1/3 = 33 1/3%

                                increase

Finding Percentage of A Number

  • of means multiply, as in What is 20% of 80?  

20/100 x 80 =1600/100 = 16           or        0.20 x 80 = 16.00 = 16

  • Change what to x; is becomes =;of means multiply.

o   18 is what % of 90?

18= x(90), so 18/90 = x, hence x= 1/5

o   10 is 50% of what #?

                                    10=0.50(x), so 10/0.50 = x, hence x = 20

o   What is 15% of 60?

x = 15/100 x 60 = 90/10 = 9       or        x = 0.15(60) = 9

 

Powers & Exponents

  • Multiply x times itself indicated by the exponent (power) it is raised/lowered to.      22= 2×2 = 4;        54=5x5x5x5 = 625; 3-3=1/33=1/27
  • x0 = 1, NOT 0
  • x1 = x
  • To multiply two #s w/ exponents, If the base #s are the same, keep the base and add the exponents.               23 x 25 = 28
  • To divide two #s w/ exponents, If the base #s are the same, keep the base and subtract the exponents.               36 ÷ 33 = 33
  • To multiply or divide exponents if the base #s are different, simplify the exponents first, then solve.   32 x 22 = 9 x 4= 36

62 ÷ 23 = 36 ÷ 8 = 4 4/8 = 4 ½

  • To add or subtract #s with exponents, always simplify & solve.
  • If a # w/ an exponent is taken to another power, keep the base # & multiply the exponents.                                    (44)3 = 46

Scientific Notation

  • Always uses the power of 10.
  • If decimal is used, account for it in the exponent.
  • Positive  exponents = greater than 1 (add 0s)           3.5 x 104 = 35,000
  • Negative exponents = less than 1 (decimal form)     0.00047 = 4.7 x 10-4
  • To Multiply in Scientific Notation, 1st multiply numbers for the 1st number, and 2nd add the powers of 10 to get the 2nd number.

(2 x 102)(3 x 104) = 6 x 106

(6 x 105)(5 x 1012) = 30 x 1012

  • To Divide in Scientific Notation, 1st divide the numbers to get the 1st number, and 2nd subtract the powers of 10 to get the 2nd number.

(8 x 105)÷(2 x 102) = 4 x 103

16 Perfect Squares                                                                       8 Perfect Cubes

02 = 0

82 = 64

 

03 = 0

12 = 1

92 = 81

 

13 = 1

22 = 4

102 = 100

 

23 = 8

32 = 9

112 = 121

 

33 = 27

42 = 16

122 = 144

 

43 = 64

52 = 25

132 = 169

 

53 = 125

62 = 36

142 = 196

 

63 = 216

72 = 49

152 = 225

 

73 = 343

Square Roots

First 11 Square Roots & 10000                                                            First 6 Cube Roots

?0 = 0

?36 = 6

 

3?0 = 0

?1 = 1

?49 = 7

 

3?1 = 1

?4 = 2

?64 = 8

 

3?8 = 2

?9 = 3

?81= 9

 

3?27 = 3

?16 = 4

?100 = 10

 

3?64 = 4

?25 = 5

?10000 = 100

 

3? = 5

  • To solve square roots, you have to approximate between common numbers you know to be squares.                                Find ?42.

?36 < ?42 > ?49, so

?36 = 6 and ?49 = 7. 

(The answer must be between 6 & 7, so approximate.)

6.5 x 6.5 = 42.25, closest possible to 42.

  • Square roots of non-perfect squares can be approximated or looked up in tables.  These are two common ones:

?2 = 1.414

?3 = 1.732

  • To simplify square roots: factor out the perfect square, simplify it and leave the other factored square in square root form.

?32 = = 4?2

 

 

Data Analysis Review

 Probability

  • Numerical measure of chance; (=) likelihood of a certain outcome occurring
  • Formula:       number of favorable outcomes

number of possible outcomes

 

What is the probability that on two consecutive rolls of a die, the numbers will be 2 and 3?      6 sided die; 1 chance out of 6 to get a 2; 1 chance out of 6 to get a 3.

                        1/6 x 1/6 = 1/36

What is the probability of tossing heads three consecutive times with a two-sided fair coin?                 1 chance out of 2 possible answers to get heads, three times.

                        1/2 x 1/2 x 1/2 = 1/8

Combinations & Permutations

            Combinations

  • If order makes no difference (independent from eachother), and all combinations have an equal chance of occurring, then the total # of choices is the total product of each choice at a given stage.

How many shirt & tie combinations can be made out of 5 different colored shirts and 3 different colored ties?      5 x 3 = 15

      Permutations

  • If there is a number of successive choices and each is affected by the previous choice or choices (dependent upon order), then the total # of choices takes into account that one choice eliminates an option with each given stage.
  1. How many ways can you arrange the letters STOP in a row?

# of choices        # of choices        # of choices        # of choices

1st letter S           2nd letter T         3rd letter O         4th letter P

      4               x               3              x             2             x           1

 

4! = 4 x 3 x 2 x 1 = 24 Possible choices

  1. How many ways can 4 out of 7 books be arranged on a shelf?

P (n, r) =          n!           n=7   

                        r!(n-r)!   r= 4

7!                     7!                     7x6x5x4x3x2x1

(7-4)! =            3!  =     3x2x1       =      7x6x5x4                       =840

 

Statistics

  • 3 Basic Measures of Central Tendencies

o   Mean – The average; Weighted mean accounts for frequency

  • If two exams are worth 20% and one is worth 60%, take the number of each & multiply it by it’s worth in %, then do the same for the other %; add the scores together & divide total # for the mean (in this case 3).

2 x .20 + 1 x .60 = .40 + .60 =1.0/3 = 33.3% each is the weighted mean

o   Median – #s arranged in ascending or descending order and the middle number is chosen; if 2 numbers are the median, take the mean of the two numbers .    1,4,9 then median is 4;

3, 7, 8, 16 then 7 + 8 = 15 ÷2 = median is 7.5

o   Mode – The set, class or classes that appear most frequently.

Set:      3,4,8,9,9,2,6,11                       9 is the mode

  • Range is the difference between the largest & smallest number.  Range depends solely on extreme values.  Subtract lowest value in set from highest.          3, 5, 7, 3, 2               highest is 7                      7-2 =5 

lowest is 2                            The range is 5.

Standard Deviation

 

  • Standard Deviation – how far data values of a population are from the mean value of the population.

o   Small SD  – data values are close to the mean value.

o   Large SD  – data values are “spread out” from the mean.

 

  µ (mean)                 ?(standard deviation)

  • Approx 68% falls within one ? (SD) from the µ (mean).
  • Approx 95.5% falls within two ? from µ.
  • Approx 99.8% falls within three ? from µ.

 

Basic Method For Calculating ? for a Population (Figuring the VARIANCE)

 

  1. Find the µ (mean).
  2. For each data value, find the difference between it and the µ.  Square the difference to account for both sides of the µ.
  3. Find the sum of all the squares from step 2.
  4. Divide the sum in step 3 by total # of data values.
  5. Find the square root of the value in step 4.

 

  • Standard deviation is the square root of the variance.

Find the variance & standard deviation for the following set of data:

{3,7,7,8,10}

  1. Find µ:           3+7+7+8+10           35

5             =       5   = 7

  1. Find the squares of differences between the data values & µ.

Data value

Mean (µ)

Data value – µ

(Data value – µ)2

3

7

3-7=-4

-4 x -4 = 16

7

7

7-7=0

0 x 0 = 0

7

7

7-7=0

0 x 0 = 0

8

7

8-7=1

1 x 1 = 1

10

7

10-7=3

3 x 3 = 9

  1. Add the sum of the squares:  16 + 1 + 9 = 26
  2. Divide the sum from the total number of data values there are. 26

  5  = 5.2

                                    Variance = 5.2

  1. Find the square root of the value in step 4.  ?5.2 = 2.2803

Standard deviation (?) = 2.2803

Number Sequences

  • Progression of numbers are sequences with some patterns.  Find the common difference to solve the problem.

o   4, 8, 12, 16, 20…add +4

o   1,2,4,7,11,16…the differences are consecutive # +1, +2, +3, +4, +5…

o   2,3,5,8,13,21…numbers are added to the next consecutive number…

o   1,5,3,7,5,9…every other number is +2 from each other

o   0,1,1,2,3…multiply adjacent numbers and then add 1.  Next is 7.

Units of Measure

English System (Customary)

Metric System

Length

Length (meter)

12 inches = 1 foot

3 ft. = 1 yard

36 in. = 1 yard

1760 yards = 1 mile

5280 ft. = 1 mile

1 Kilometer (km)= 1000 meters (m)

1 Hectometer (hm) = 100 meters

1 Decameter (dam) = 10 meters

10 decimeters (dm) = 1 meter

100 centimeters (cm) = 1 meter

1000 millimeters (mm) = 1 meter

Area

Volume (liter)

144 sq. in. = 1 sq. ft.

9 sq. ft. = 1 sq. yard

1000 milliliters (ml) = 1 liter (l)

1000 liters = 1 kiloliter (kl)

Weight

Mass (gram)

16 oz. = 1 lb.

2000 lbs = 1 ton (T)

Capacity

2 cups = 1 pt.

2 pts. = 1 qt.

4 qts. = 1 gal.

4 pecks = 1 bushel

1000 milligrams (mg) = 1 gram (g)

1000 grams = 1 kilogram (kg)

1000 kilograms = 1 metric ton (t)

Time

Some Approximations (in comparison)

365 days = 1 year

52 wks = 1 yr.

10 yrs. = 1 decade

100 yrs = 1 century

 

  • A meter is a little more than a yard.
  • A kilometer is about .6 of a mile.
  • A kilogram is about 2.2 lbs.
  • A liter is slightly more than a quart.

If 36 in. equals 1 yard, then 3 yds equals how many inches?            36 x 3 = 10 inches

If 2.2 lbs equals 1 kg, then 10 lbs equals how many kgs?      10 ÷ 2.2 = 4.5 kgs

Change 3 decades into weeks.

 1 decade = 10 years;  1 year = 52 wks; 52 x 10 = 520 weeks; 520 x 3 = 1560 weeks

Algebra I and Geometry

  • Both Algebra and Geometry are rooted in the memorization of formulas, which can be located in a variety of sources:  college level mathematics textbooks, GRE Math Test preparation books, online, etc.  Due to the complexity of the review required in these areas, we have not provided any study tips for this section here.  However, there are many valuable tools online to refresh and become more adept at Algebra I and Geometry.  A free website that provides videos of core concepts and visual examples of worked problems is http://www.khanacademy.org/mission/math.  Many of these Khan Academy videos can be located on Youtube, as well. 
  • For those of you who need to refresh the core concepts of Algebra and geometry, many books are available in the local library or book store that will provide a basic mathematics review.  One recommended example is CliffNotes Math Review for Standardized tests by Jerry Bobrow (2010).

Quantitative Comparisons

  • Keep in mind that you do not necessarily need to work out every problem to find the correct answer.  The GRE Quantitative Comparison section is designed to assess your ability to identify answers using heuristics and logic.  For example, acquiring the ability to identify the range of a specific answer can often eliminate choices that fall outside of that range.  For this reason, we stress the importance of acquiring GRE test prep books, practice tests, tutoring and courses in order to provide you with the best opportunity to learn GRE specific strategies.

Good luck to you all.  Happy studying!

Disclaimer:  The information contained in these pages was developed from personal experiences with preparing for the GRE, as well as recommended sources used by officers of Psi Chi in their own GRE preparation.  The information provided on these pages is not meant to be used in place of recommended GRE study materials, and is only meant to provide basic direction for preparation for the exam.  All examples used are provided in the text and include material adapted from Kaplan GRE Premier 2013, Barron’s GRE Test prep 2013, Princeton Review GRE 2012, and CliffNotes Math Review for Standardized Tests (2nd Edition).